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FAQ

Please click on any of the tabs below to find answers to your most frequently asked questions. If you are unable to find the answer, please call our office during regular business hours at 954-357-VOTE (8683) or email us at elections@browardvotes.gov.

Campaign Advertising Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What information must be included on a political disclaimer?
    • Any political advertisement that is paid for by a candidate (except a write-in candidate) and that is published, displayed, or circulated before, or on the day of, any election must prominently state: 
      • "Political advertisement paid for and approved by (name of candidate), (party affiliation) for (office sought)" or "Paid by (name of candidate), (party affiliation), for (office sought)."
    • Disclaimer for Write-in Candidates - Any political advertisement that is paid for by a write-in candidate and that is published, or circulated before, or on the day of, any election must prominently state:
      • "Political advertisement paid for and approved by"(name of candidate)", write-in candidate, for "(office sought)"; or "Paid by"(name of candidate)", write-in candidate, for"(office sought)"
    • If the candidate for partisan office is running as a candidate with no party affiliation:
      • Any advertisement of the candidate must state that the candidate has no party affiliation.
    • Independent Expenditure Disclaimers
      • Any political advertisement paid for by an independent expenditure shall prominently state "Paid political advertisement paid for by (name and address or person paying for advertisement) independently of any (candidate or committee)."
      • Any person who makes an independent expenditure for a political advertisement shall provide a written statement that no candidate has approved the advertisement to the newspaper, radio station, television station, or other medium for each such advertisement submitted for publication, display, broadcast, or other distribution. The advertisement must also contain a statement that no candidate has approved the advertisement. This paragraph does not apply to campaign messages used by a candidate and his or her supporters if those messages are designed to be worn by a person.
    • Disclaimers for Other Than Independent Expenditures
      • Any political advertisement, not paid for by a candidate, including those paid for by a political party or affiliated party committee, other than an independent expenditure, offered on behalf of a candidate must be approved in advance by the candidate. Such political advertisement must expressly state that the content of the advertisement was approved by the candidate and must state who paid for the advertisement.
    • For more disclaimer examples and exceptions from the disclaimer requirement, especially for technology-based advertising, see Candidate and Committee Handbooks located on our Publications page.
  1. Can my political ad say "re-elect" if I'm not the incumbent?
    • If a candidate is not the incumbent for the office being sought, the word "re-elect" may not be used and the word "for" must be placed between the name of the candidate and the office sought. (Section 106.143(6), F.S.)
  1. What is an electioneering communication?
    • Electioneering communication means any communication publicly distributed by a television station, radio station, cable television system, satellite system, newspaper, magazine, direct mail, or telephone that:
      • Refers to or depicts a clearly identified candidate for office without expressly advocating the election or defeat of a candidate but that is susceptible of no reasonable interpretation other than an appeal to vote for or against a specific candidate; 
      • Is made within 30 days before a primary or special primary election or 60 days before any other election for the office sought by the candidate; and
      • Is targeted to the relevant electorate in the geographical area the candidate would represent if elected.
    • (Section 106.011(18), F.S.). For exceptions to the above definition, see the Electioneering Communications Handbook on our Publications page.
  1. Do electioneering communications need disclaimers?
    • Yes. The disclaimer must read: "Paid electioneering communication paid for by (name and address of person paying for the communication)" (Section 106.1439, F.S.)
  1. Do I have to report expenditures for electioneering communications?
    • Yes. If the expenditure is not otherwise required to reported by Chapter 106, F.S., it must be reported if the expenditure was $5000 or more. It is reported in the same manner, at the same time and subject to the same penalties as are political committee expenditures. (Section 106.071(1), F.S.) If the expenditure is made by an electioneering communication organization, the reporting requirements are located in Section 106.0703, F.S.

Campaign Finance Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Do candidates for precinct committeeperson have to file campaign reports and comply with Chapter 106, F.S.?
    • Only if such candidates receive a contribution or make an expenditure.  An individual seeking a publicly elected position on a political party executive committee who receives a contribution or makes an expenditure shall file a report of all contributions received and all expenditures made. The report shall be filed by 5 p.m. with the supervisor of elections on the 4th day immediately preceding the primary election. (Section 106.0702, F.S.)
  1. May a candidate appoint himself or herself as campaign treasurer?
    • Yes. (Section 106.021(1)(c), F.S.)
  1. How many deputy treasurers may a candidate or political committee have?
    • Candidates for statewide office may appoint up to 15 deputy treasurers. Other candidates and political committees may appoint up to 3 deputy treasurers. (Section 106.021(1)(a), F.S.)
  1. Can a deputy treasurer file and submit campaign reports?
    • Yes. A deputy treasurer may perform all of the duties of a campaign treasurer when specifically authorized to do so by the campaign treasurer in the case of a candidate, or the campaign treasurer and chairperson in the case of a political committee. (Section 106.021(4), F.S.)
  1. Who is responsible for keeping tabs on aggregate totals of campaign contributions?
    • The campaign treasurer is responsible for receiving and reporting all contributions. (Section 106.06, F.S.)
  1. May a candidate accept a contribution from a trust fund?
    • Yes. Chapter 106, F.S., defines a "person" as an individual, corporation, association, firm, partnership, joint venture, joint stock company, club, organization, estate, trust, business trust, syndicate, or other combination of individuals having collective capacity. The term also includes a political party, affiliated party committee, or political committee. (Section 106.011(14), F.S.)
  1. Do I have to itemize small contributions of $5, $10, $50, etc.?
    • Yes. The law provides no exceptions for the reporting of contribution information, regardless of the size of the contribution. The full name and address of the contributor are also required. (Section 106.07(4)(a), F.S.)
  1. Are in-kind contributions subject to the same limitations as monetary contributions?
    • Yes. In Chapter 106, F.S., the definition of a "contribution" includes contributions in-kind having an attributable monetary value in any form. Therefore, in-kind contributions are subject to the same limitations set for monetary contributions. (Section 106.011(5) and 106.08, F.S.)
  1. How is the value of an in-kind contribution determined?
    • The contributor must inform the person receiving the contribution of the fair market value at the time it is given. (Section 106.055, F.S.)
  1. Can a corporation give to a candidate, political committee or political party?
    • Yes. A corporation is considered a "person" under Chapter 106, F.S.
  1. Would a corporation have to file as a political committee if it contributes to a candidate or other political committee?
    • Corporations regulated by chapters 607 or 617, F.S., and other business entities formed for purposes other than to support or oppose issues or candidates are exempt from the definition of a "political committee" as long as their political activities are limited to contributions to candidates or political committees, or expenditures in support of or in opposition to an issue, from corporate or business funds. Corporations and other business entities remove themselves from this exemption if they solicit or receive contributions outside their corporate or business funds for political purposes. (Section 106.011(16), F.S.)
  1. I am opposed in the general election, but I have no opposition in the primary election, therefore, my name will not be on the primary election ballot. Am i prohibited from accepting contributions in the five days before the primary election?
    • No. Only candidates opposed in the primary election are required to comply. However, since you are opposed and your name will appear on the general election ballot, you are required to abide by the prohibition on accepting contributions less than 5 days prior to the general election. (Section 106.08(3), F.S.)
  1. I was given cash at a rally and have no information on who it is from? What do I do?
    • Report this contribution as an anonymous contribution on your campaign report but do not spend these funds on the campaign. After the campaign is over, dispose of the funds pursuant to Section 106.141, F.S. (DEO 89-02)
  1. As a candidate, what can I do with leftover campaign funds?
    • If qualified by the petition method and filed an oath stating that it would impose an undue burden on your personal or other resources to pay the fee to verify petition signatures, you will first need to reimburse the state or local government entity, whichever is applicable. (Section 106.141(7), F.S.) Otherwise You may disburse of funds by any of the following means or a combination thereof:
      • return pro rata to each contributor;
      • donate to a charitable organization or organizations that meet the qualifications of s. 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code;
      • give not more than $25,000 to the affiliated party committee or political party of which the candidate is a member;
      • give, if applicable, to the political subdivision for which you were a candidate for office and deposit it in the subdivision's general fund (Section 106.141(4)(a), F.S.);
      • give, of applicable, to the state, if you were a candidate for state office and it in the General Revenue Fund.
    • Candidates who have received contributions for public campaign financing shall return all surplus funds to the state. (Section 106.141(4)(b), F.S.)
    • A candidate elected to state office or a candidate who will be elected to state office by virtue of his or her being unopposed after candidate qualifying ends, may retain up to $20,000 in his or her campaign account, or in an interest-bearing account or certificate of deposit, for use in his or her next campaign for the same office.  (Section 106.141(4)(c), F.S.)
    • In addition to the methods listed above, a candidate elected to office (or will be elected by virtue of being unopposed) may transfer funds from the campaign account to an office account to be used only for legitimate expenses in connection with the candidate's public office. The amount which can be transferred is limited by law.  (Section 106.141(5), F.S.)
  1. Can I combine my leftover campaign funds with a legislative account?
    • No. The office account must be separate from any other account (including a legislative account). (Section 106.141, F.S.)
  1. I am an elected official and still have funds in my office account. I am now beginning my re-election campaign. May I place the surplus funds in the office account into my campaign account for re-election?
    • No. Funds retained by elected officials in their office accounts may only be used for legitimate expenses in connection with their public office. (Section 106.141(5), F.S.)
  1. Do I have to file campaign reports on the Electronic Filing System (EFS)?
    • If the Division of Elections is your filing officer, you are required to file all campaign reports via the EFS. If your filing officer is other than the Division of Elections, you must contact his or her office to find out their requirements. (Section 106.0705, F.S.)
  1. If my treasurer is out of town, can I have an extension to file my report?
    • No. The election laws do not provide for an extension under these circumstances. (Sections 106.07(2)(b) and (3), F.S.)
  1. If I make a mistake on my report can I go back in and correct it on the EFS?
    • Once the report is submitted to the Division of Elections, the EFS will not permit you to go back and make changes. In order to correct mistakes or add and delete information, you must submit an amended report.
  1. If I am late submitting my report, how is my fine calculated?
    • Candidates, political committees, electioneering communication organizations and independent expenditures: $50 per day for the first 3 days late and, thereafter, $500 per day for each late day, not to exceed 25% of the total receipts or expenditures, whichever is greater for the period covered by the late report. However, for reports immediately preceding the primary and general election, the fine shall be $500 per day for each day, not to exceed 25% of the total receipts or expenditures, whichever is greater, for the period covered by the late report.
    • State and county executive committees: $1,000 for a state executive committee and $50 for a county executive committee per day for each late day, not to exceed 25% of the total receipts or expenditures, whichever is greater, for the period covered by the late report. However, if an executive committee fails to file a report on the Friday immediately preceding the general election, the fine is $10,000 per day for each late day a state executive committee is late and $500 per day for each day a county executive committee is late.
  1. How long are campaign records kept at the Division of Elections or the Supervisor of Elections Offices?
    • Ten years from the date of receipt. (Sections 98.015(5) and 106.22(4), F.S.)

Candidates Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What are the residency requirements for candidates?
    1. President of the United States: a natural born citizen and resident of the U.S. for the last 14 years.
    2. United States Senator: a citizen of the U.S. for at least 9 years and resident of the state when elected.
    3. United States Representative in Congress: a citizen of the U.S. for at least 7 years and resident of the state when elected.
    4. Governor and Lieutenant Governor: an elector and resident of the state for the preceding 7 years.
    5. Cabinet Members: an elector and resident of the state for the preceding 7 years.
    6. State Senator: an elector and resident of the district upon taking office and a resident of the state for at least 2 years prior to election.
    7. State Representative: an elector and resident of the district upon taking office and a resident of the state for at least 2 years prior to election.
    8. State Attorney: an elector and resident of the circuit upon taking office.
    9. Public Defender: an elector and resident of the circuit upon taking office.
    10. Justice of the Supreme Court: an elector and resident of the state upon taking office.
    11. Judge, District Court of Appeal: an elector and resident of the territorial jurisdiction of the court upon taking office.
    12. Circuit Judge: an elector and resident of the territorial jurisdiction of the court upon taking office.
    13. County Offices: See Division of Elections Opinion 94-04.
  1. If I want to be a no party affiliation candidate, can I still be registered to vote as a Republican or Democrat?
    1. Yes. Any registered elector who qualifies for office without party affiliation will have their name placed on the ballot at the general election without party affiliation. (Section 99.0955(1), F.S.)
  1. Do I have to designate a campaign treasurer and depository before I make public my intention to run for office?
    1. No. Nothing in the election laws prohibits a person from announcing their intention to become a candidate prior to designating a treasurer or depository as long as no contributions are received and no expenditures are made in connection with that announcement. (Section 106.021, F.S.)
  1. What if I want to change my campaign treasurer or other officers?
    1. File a reappointment of campaign treasurer (Form DS-DE 9) with the filing officer along with a copy of the letter of resignation or removal.
  1. How are judges elected in Florida and what are their terms?
    1. Merit Retention - Not all judges in Florida are elected to office. Supreme Court Justices and Judges of the District Court of Appeal are always appointed by the Governor from a list of three to six candidates presented by the Judicial Nominating Commission for that court. Once appointed, they must serve at least one year before the next general election and, thereafter, must face a "yes" or "no" vote every six years as to whether they will remain in office. If a judge is not retained the appointment process starts again. Further information can be obtained from the Florida State Courts website.
    2. Elected Judges- Circuit judges and county court judges have six year terms that begin on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January following the general election. They are on the primary and general election ballots the year before the term ends in January. If a judicial candidate receives a majority of the votes at the primary election, the candidate's name will not appear on the general election ballot unless a write-in candidate has qualified for the same office. If no candidate receives a majority of the votes at the primary election, the names of the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes will appear on the general election ballot. The candidate receiving the highest number of votes at the general election is elected to office.
  1. Can a judicial candidate speak at a political party function?
    1. A judicial candidate may attend and speak in his own behalf at political party functions. However, care must be exercised to insure compliance with the election laws and the Code of Judicial Conduct. (Chapter 105, F.S. and DE 78-34) The Judicial Ethics Advisory Commission has stated that judicial candidates may attend political functions to speak about their candidacy as long as the function is not a fundraiser, and the other candidates, if any, are also invited. The judicial candidate may not, however, attend if the political party function is a social gathering where the candidate would not speak to the body, but would merely have the opportunity to speak with other guests. (JEAC Opinion 2004-11.) Other opinions regarding election matters can be obtained from the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee Opinions website.
  1. I am a county court judge candidate. Where do I file and qualify?
    1. You must file your appointment of campaign treasurer and designation of campaign depository and qualify with the supervisor of elections’ office in the county where you seek election. (Section 105.031, F.S.)
  1. When can I start collecting signatures to qualify as a petition candidate?
    1. Before collecting any signatures, all candidates (except federal candidates and special district candidates who have not collected contributions and whose only expense is the signature verification fee) must file the Appointment of Campaign Treasurer and Designation of Campaign Depository (Form DS-DE 9) with the filing officer. Each petition must be submitted before noon of the 28th day preceding the first day of the qualifying period for the office sought to the Supervisor of Elections of the county in which such petition was circulated.
  1. Where can I locate a list of candidates for upcoming or prior elections?
  • You can view a list of candidates that file with the Division of Elections by searching the Candidates and Races Database or those candidates that files with the SOE.
  • Elections Frequently Asked Questions

    1. Where can I locate information on upcoming elections, including the Presidential Preference Primary?
      • A General Election is held in November of every even-numbered year. The Primary Election for nominating party nominees for the General Election is 11 weeks before the General Election. Additionally, a Presidential Preference Primary is held on the third Tuesday in March of each presidential election year. Special elections may be called at any time during the year.  Further information can be found on our Election Dates page. 
    1. Where can I find information about the Electoral College and how the President of the United States is actually elected?
      • The National Archives' website explains the history and operation of the Electoral College. The Office of the Federal Register coordinates the functions of the Electoral College on behalf of the Archivist of the United States, the States, the Congress, and the American People.
    1. How do I become a poll worker?
      • Contact our offices at (954) 459-9911 about becoming a poll worker. A poll worker is required to attend at least 2 hours of training (at least 3 hours if holding a higher position) prior to each election that he or she is serving. A poll worker is paid. As a poll worker you must be a registered qualified elector of the county in which you are serving. You must also be able to read and write the English language. Bi-lingual speakers (especially those who speak Spanish) are encouraged to apply and serve.
    1. Must a poll watcher be a registered voter?
      • Yes. Each poll watcher must be a registered voter of the county in which he or she serves.
    1. May a candidate serve as a poll watcher?
      • No candidate, sheriff, deputy sheriff, police officer or other law enforcement officer may serve as a poll watcher.
    1. What percentage comprises a win in the primary?
      • The partisan candidate receiving the highest number of votes will be nominated. In nonpartisan races, if no candidate receives a majority of the votes, the top two candidates will be voted on in the general election.
    1. I want to vote in the primary. Do I have to be a Democrat or Republican?
      • Since Florida is a closed primary state, only voters who are registered members of the respective political party's candidates can vote for those candidate nominees in a primary election. Typically that would be either one of the two major political parties (Republicans and Democrats) but it can also include minor political parties if they have candidates for an office on the primary election ballot. All registered voters can vote in a primary election, regardless of which major or minor political party they are registered or even if they are registered without a specific party affiliation when:
        • All the candidates for an office have the same party affiliation and the winner of the primary election will not face any opposition in the general election (i.e. no write-in candidates have qualified).
        • The race is nonpartisan (i.e., prohibited from qualifying or campaigning based upon party affiliation) (e.g., judicial and school board offices, nonpartisan special districts or local referendum questions).
      • At a general election, all registered voters receive the same ballot and may vote for any candidate or question on the ballot. If there are write-in candidates who have qualified for a particular office, a space will be left on the general election ballot where their name can be written.
    1. Are all judges retained in office by voting "for retention" or "against retention?"
      • Justices of the Supreme Court and Judges of the District Courts of Appeal are subject to retention voting. Circuit judges and county judges are subject to election just like other candidates except where a local option has passed calling for selection of these judges by merit selection and retention voting. (Sections 105.041(2), 105.051(2), F.S., and Article V, Section 10, Florida Constitution) At the present time, all circuit judges and county court judges are elected.
    1. Where can I find election results (current or past)?
      • Election results for current elections are reported in several stages, starting with preliminary (unofficial) election night results through certification of official results two weeks after Election Day. Live results for current federal, state, multicounty and special elections are released statewide and made available online on Election Day after 8:00 pm (EST) pm the Division of Elections' Florida Election Watch webpage or on the SOE website.
    1. What is voter turnout?
      • Voter turnout refers to the percentage of eligible registered voters who cast a ballot in the election. The statewide voter turnout is calculated based on the total number of registered voters who cast a ballot versus the number of active eligible registered voters in the book closing report for the upcoming state election. Visit our webpage on Elections Data for past voter turnout.
    1. What is a recount?
      • A recount may consist of only a machine recount or a machine recount following by a manual recount.
        • machine recount means all ballots are "re-fed" (re-tabulated) into the machine. Ballots that have overvotes (where the voter chose more than allowed in the race) and ballots that have undervotes (where the voter made no choice or fewer than the number of allowable choices) in the race being recounted are set aside. Those ballots with overvotes and undervotes will be reviewed in a manual recount if subsequently ordered.
        • manual recount consists solely of a hand recount of overvotes and undervotes in the affected race. You cannot have a manual recount without the machine recount first.
    1. What triggers a recount?
      • machine recount is triggered when a candidate is defeated or eliminated by 1/2 of 1% or less (.5% or less) of the total votes cast in the affected contest. The same threshold applies for a judicial candidate for retention who was retained or not retained, or a public measure (e.g. constitutional amendment) that was approved or rejected. If the candidate or judicial candidate asks that a recount not be conducted, a machine recount is not required.
      • manual recount is triggered when the results of the machine recount show that the candidate was actually defeated or eliminated by ¼ of 1% or less (.25% or less) of the total votes cast for the affected contest. The same threshold applies for a judicial candidate for retention who was retained or not retained, or a public measure (e.g., constitutional amendment) that was approved or rejected. If the candidate or judicial candidate asks that a recount not be conducted, a manual recount is not required. If the number of overvotes and undervotes is less than the number of votes needed to change the elections’ outcome, a manual recount is also not required.
  • Recounts may only be ordered by the Secretary of State (for federal, state, multi-county races and districts) and by the county canvassing boards (for county and local races).
  • Minor Political Parties Frequently Asked Questions

    1. What is a minor political party?
      • In Florida, a minor political party is defined as a group specified in section 103.095, Florida Statutes which on January 1 preceding a primary election has less than 5% of the registered voters of the state. (Section  97.021(18), Florida Statutes)
    1. Who can become a minor political party in Florida?
      • Any group of citizens organized for the general purpose of electing to office qualified persons and determining public issues under the democratic processes of the United States may become a minor political party.  (Section  97.021(18), Florida Statutes)
    1. How does a group become registered as a minor political party in Florida?
      • The group of citizens must submit a certificate showing the name of the organization, the names and addresses of its current officers, including the members of its executive committee, accompanied by a completed uniform statewide voter registration application as specified in section 97.052, Florida Statutes, for each of its current officers and members of its executive committee which reflect their affiliation with the proposed minor political party, and a copy of its constitution, bylaws, and rules and regulations to the Division of Elections, Department of State, R.A. Gray Building, Room 316, 500 S. Bronough Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0250. (Section 103.095(1), Florida Statutes)
      • Please also note the officers must include a chair, vice chair, secretary, and treasurer elected by the members of the executive committee who must be members of the minor political party and no member may hold more than one office, except one person may hold the offices of secretary and treasurer. (Section 103.09(3), Florida Statutes)
      • Once received, the Division will review the documentation for legal sufficiency and notify the group if the party is approved as a minor political party in Florida. Once approved, the Division shall process the voter registration applications submitted by the members of the executive committee of the minor political party.
      • Recognition of the group in Florida as a minor political party does not mean the group is recognized as a party in other states or at the federal level.
    1. Is there a special form or format for a group to request recognition as a minor political party?
      • No; however, the laws envision the group who is requesting recognition as a minor political party to file a signed document along the lines of:
        • I certify the following: 
        • (1)  The name of the minor political party is the _____________ Party. 
        • (2) The current officers of this party are:  (list name, party office, and address of each officer – the officers must at least include a chair, vice-chair, secretary, and treasurer with all being different individuals, except the secretary and treasurer may be the same person.  All must be registered members of the minor political party).
        • (3) The members of the party’s executive committee are:  (list name, party position, and address of each member; of the executive committee.)
        • Attached are copies of the party’s constitution, bylaws, and rules/regulations.  Also attached are the voter registration applications for each of the party’s officers and members of its executive committee reflecting their desired membership in the party. ___________________________________ (Authorized party officer’s signature)
      • To constitute a “group,” the party organizers must consist of more than one person.  While the same person may occupy the offices of the party’s treasurer and secretary on its executive committee, separate persons must be the chair and vice chair.
      • The party’s officers and the members of its executive committee may be the same people, but the listing of the party’s officers and executive committee members must conform to the requirements as set forth in party’s constitution bylaws, and rules.
      • To ensure the application as a minor political party satisfies the statutory requirements, use the Minor Political Party Checklist - PDF (updated 3.18.16).
    1. Are there any statutory requirements that must be contained in the party’s constitution, bylaws, rules, or regulations?
      • Yes. The constitution, bylaws, rules, regulation, or equivalent documents: (1) Must reflect that each voter registered as a member of the minor political party has a fundamental right to fully and meaningfully participate in the business and affairs of the party without any monetary encumbrance; and (2) Must have provisions that, at a minimum, reasonably prescribe procedures to: (a) prescribe its membership; (b) conduct its meetings according to generally accepted parliamentary practices; (c) timely notify its members as to the time, date, and place of all of its meetings; (d) timely publish notice on its public and functioning website as to the time, date, and place of all its meetings; (e) elect its officers; (f) remove its officers; (g) make party nomination when required by law; (h) conduct campaigns for party nominees; (i) raise and expend party funds; (j) select delegates to its national convention, if applicable; (k) select presidential electors, if applicable; and (l) alter or amend the party’s governing documents. (Section 103.095(2), Florida Statutes)
    1. Does the party have to submit anything else to the Division of Elections after the Division approves its registration?
      • The Division will provide the party a letter acknowledging its registration and the letter will inform the party about registration on the state’s campaign electronic finance reporting system, which the party must use in filing periodic campaign finance reports.  The party must report its contributions and expenditures pursuant to Section 106.29, Florida Statutes, on at least a quarterly basis, and on a more expedited schedule before a primary or general election.  The party’s chair and treasurer must certify to the correctness of each report; any chair or treasurer who certifies a report knowing it is incorrect, false, or incomplete commits a felony.   (Sections 106.0705 and 106.29, Florida Statutes)
    1. Are there restrictions on how a political party can use its contributions?
      • Yes.  The officers of the political party must become familiar with Chapter 106, Florida Statutes (Campaign Finance), regarding limitations on the party’s contributions and expenditures.  Some examples of restrictions (not an all inclusive list) on contributions are that a political party cannot use contributions received less than 5 days before an election on behalf of a candidate, issue, or the party participating in the election; the party cannot accept any contribution that is designated for a particular candidate; and the party cannot accept any in-kind contribution that fails to provide a direct benefit to the political party.  (Sections 106.08 and 106.29, Florida Statutes)
    1. If the party’s officers, executive committee members, or its constitution or bylaws change, does the party have to notify the Division of Elections?
      • Yes.  If changes occur that reflect a change in the party’s original filing certificate, the party must notify the Division of Elections within 5 days of the change.  (Section 103.095(4), Florida Statutes)
    1. Who is responsible for advertising that the minor political party is a political party operating in Florida?
      • The responsibility rests on the party; however, the Division of Elections will notify each of the county supervisors of elections regarding the recognition of the newly created political party.  The Division also will list the minor political party on its political party webpage; however, the party has the sole responsibility to recruit members for the party and have voters register in the party. 
      • If the party solicits or collects voter registration applications to recruit persons to register as a member of the party, the party must comply with the third-party voter registration organization law in Section 97.0575, Florida Statutes.  For information about becoming a third-party voter registration organization, please consult the Division’s 3PVRO webpage.
    1. Do candidates who qualify as candidates from a minor political party pay a party assessment?
      • Whether the minor political party candidate pays a party assessment at the time of qualifying is a matter left to the discretion of the party.  If paid, the assessment equates to 2% of the annual salary of the office being sought (Section 99.092, Florida Statutes).  The minor political party must inform the Division of Election if it wants the qualifying officer to levy the party assessment, which the qualifying officer will subsequently remit to the party.
    1. Will minor political party candidates appear on primary election ballots?
      • If more than one candidate from the minor political party has qualified for the same office, the names of the candidates will appear on the ballot and only registered members of the minor political party will be permitted to vote for the candidates.  If only one candidate has qualified for the office, the candidate’s name will not be on the primary ballot, but will appear on the general election ballot.
    1. How does a minor political party terminate its status as a minor political party?
      • The authorized party officer provides to the Division of Elections a signed letter indicating that it is withdrawing or terminating its political party status in Florida.  The Division will acknowledge the termination and remove the party from its list of authorized minor political parties in Florida.
    1. Can the party’s status as a political party be terminated involuntarily?
      • Yes. See Rule 1S-2.050 for the possible termination reasons and procedures.  The political party has the right to appeal its termination to the Florida Elections Commission. (Section 103.095(5), Florida Statutes)
    1. If I have questions, who do I contact about becoming a minor political party?
  • Call the Division of Elections, Bureau of Election Records, at 850-245-6240. The Division can answer procedural questions, but cannot offer legal advice to any group desiring to form as a minor political party.
  • Poll Workers Frequently Asked Questions

    Are Poll Workers Paid?

    Yes! All our Poll Worker positions are paid after working on Election Day. Rate of pay includes Election Day and Training. *

    What are the steps to becoming a Poll Worker?

    Step 1: You MUST be a registered or pre-registered Voter in Broward County.
    Step 2: Complete a Poll Worker application online.
    Step 3: You will be contacted by a member of our Election Day Operations Department with information about  training.

    What are the different Poll Worker positions?

    Clerk, Assistant Clerk, EVID Operator, Ballot Inspector, Voting System Technician, Backup Voting System Technician, Field Voting System Technician, Early Voting Poll Worker, Poll Deputy, Cleaning Specialist.

    At what age can I become a Poll Worker and work on Election Day?

    Poll Workers must be 16 years or older and be pre-registered (age 16 or 17) or registered to vote in Broward County. Fla. Stat. 102.012(2).

    *Note: Training Session does not guarantee that you will work as a Poll Worker. You must be certified by our training staff, and then you will receive your Election Day assignment

    Political Committees Frequently Asked Questions

    1. When do I need to file as a political committee?
      • A combination of two or more individuals, or a person other than an individual (e.g., a club or organization) must file as a political committee and submit campaign reports when during a calendar year, in access of $500 aggregate, they:
        • Accept contributions or make expenditures to expressly advocate the election or defeat of a candidate or issue;
        • Accepts contributions for the purpose of contributing to any candidate, political committee, affiliated party committee, or political party; or
        • Sponsor a proposed constitutional amendment by initiative and intend to seek signatures of registered electors. (Section 106.011(16), F.S.)
    1. Where do I file as a committee?
      • Division of Elections:
        • Political committees supporting or opposing statewide, legislative or multicounty candidates or issues;
        • Political committees that would otherwise be required to file in two or more locations by reason of the committee's intention to support or oppose candidates or issues at state or multicounty and local levels;
      • Supervisor of Elections:
        • Political committees supporting or opposing countywide or less than countywide candidates or issues (except municipal).
      • Municipal Clerk:
        • Political committees supporting or opposing municipal candidates or issues.
    1. As a Political Party (e.g., Republican or Democratic) Club, am I required to file as a political committee?
      • A political party "club" is not considered a "political party executive committee;" however, if the club satisfies the definition of a "political committee" in Section 106.011(16), F.S., e.g., receives contributions or makes expenditures in excess of $500 in the aggregate per calendar year for the purpose of expressly advocating the election or defeat of a candidate or making contributions to candidates, the club is required to file and report as a political committee.
    1. If I give a contribution to a Florida congressional candidate, do I have to file as a committee?
      • No, but it is recommended that you contact the Federal Election Commission in Washington, DC at 1-800-424-9530 for information regarding contributions to federal candidates.
    1. How much money can I give to a political committee?
      • No limit exists on the amount that can be contributed to a political committee.
    1. What if my political committee wants to change the campaign treasurer or other officers?
      • File a reappointment of campaign treasurer (Form DS-DE 6) with the filing officer along with a copy of the letter of resignation or removal. To change the chairperson, a notice in writing is sufficient. (Section 106.021(2), F.S.)
    1. I want to close my committee. What do I need to do?
      • Notify the filing officer in writing as soon as possible. (Section 106.03(5), F.S.)
    1. What can my political committee do with leftover funds?
      • The political committee must disburse the funds in the manner that the committee indicated it would dispose of residual funds on the Statement of Organization of Political Committee (Form DS-DE 5), which is on file with the filing officer.

    Voter Registration Frequently Asked Questions

    1. Who can register to vote?
      1. Be a citizen of the United States of America;
      2. Be a legal resident of Florida;
      3. Be a legal resident of the county in which you seek to be registered;
      4. Be at least 16 years old to preregister or at least 18 years old to register and vote;
      5. Not be a person who has been adjudicated mentally incapacitated with respect to voting in Florida or any other state without having the right to vote restored; and,
      6. Not be a person convicted of a felony without having your right to vote restored.

    Notice: It is a 3rd degree felony to submit false information. Maximum penalties are $5,000 and/or 5 years in prison.

    1. How or where can I register to vote?
      1. Please visit Register to Vote Florida for more information.
    1. How do I update my existing Florida voter registration record?
      1. Please visit our Register to Vote Florida for more information.
    1. Does Florida have online voter registration?
      1. Yes, please visit Register to Vote Florida for more information.
    1. How can I find out if I am registered?
      1. You can also check your voter registration status  by visiting the Broward Supervisor of Elections website. If you unable to find information or need further assistance, contact the Bureau of Voter Registration Services' Voter Assistance Hotline (in English or Español) at 1-866-308-6739 during office hours or email BVRSHelp@dos.myflorida.com.
    1. I am in the military. What do I need to do to apply to register to vote?
      1. Please visit our page on Military and Overseas Citizen Voting for more information.
    1. What is the deadline to apply to register to vote?
      1. The deadline to register is 29 days before the upcoming election.
      2. For a primary election, the deadline to change parties is 29 days before election day. For a general election, a party change can be made at any time.
      3. A late registration deadline is available if you (or accompanying family member) have been discharged or separated from the Merchant Marines or armed forces, or from employment outside the territorial United States. The late registration deadline is 5 p.m. on the Friday before election day in the county in which you are to be registered. Contact our offices at 954-357-VOTE (8683) for more information and to obtain the form you have to complete.
      4. For information on voter registration deadlines for upcoming elections, please visit our Election Dates webpage.
    1. I have just moved within Florida. Is there anything I need to do about my voter registration?
      1. Whether you moved within the same county or moved to another county in Florida, you do not need to re-register to vote. However, you do need to update the address on your voter registration record.
    1. I have just moved to Florida from another state. Is there anything I need to do about my prior voter registration?
      1. If you intend to vote in Florida, you must first register to vote. Then contact the election office in your former state to cancel your prior voter registration.
    1. I have just moved away from Florida to another state. Is there anything I need to do about my voter registration?
      1. If you would like to vote in your new state, please contact the election office for your new state for information on how to register to vote there.
      2. If you are no longer a resident of Florida, send our office a written notice to cancel your Florida registration.
    1. I did not vote in the last election. Do I need to re-register to vote?
      1. Contact our office at (954) 357-7050 to verify that you are still registered to vote.
    1. I have not received my voter information card. What do I need to do?
      1. If you do not receive your card within two weeks of registering to vote or updating your voter registration record, contact our office at (954) 357-7050 to request a replacement card.
    1. I need another voter information card. How do I get a new card?
      1. Please contact our office at (954) 357-7050 to request a replacement card.
    1. Is Florida a closed primary state?
      1. Yes, please visit our Closed Primary / Party Affiliation page for more information.
    1. How does a felon get voting rights restored?
      1. If convicted of murder or felony sexual offense, voting rights in Florida can only be restored through clemency pursuant to section 8, Art. V of the Florida Constitution. To apply for clemency, search for grant of clemency and certificates, and/or find out more information about clemency, visit the website for the Florida Commission on Offender Review.
      2. If convicted of any other felony offense, voting rights are restored upon completion of all terms of a sentence including parole or probation pursuant to section 4., Art. VI of the Florida Constitution. Such convicted felon may alternatively apply for clemency to restore voting rights.
      3. For more information, please refer to specific questions answered on our web page  entitled Amendment 4: Standards Governing Eligibility to Vote After a Felony Conviction.

    Voting Frequently Asked Questions

    1. What times are the polls open on election day?
      • Polls on Election Day are open from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. (local time). Florida has two time-zones – Central and Eastern.  Any voter who is standing in line at 7 p.m. (local time) in their county is still eligible to cast a vote.
    1. Where's my precinct or polling location? What if my polling location changes?
      • Precinct and polling location information can be found on your voter information card. To find your precinct or polling location online, or for the most current information about polling place changes, visit Voter Information Lookup.
    1. Where are early voting locations? When is early voting?
      • Please visit our Early Voting page for more information about locations, dates and times. For the most current information about early voting locations and any changes.
      • Any voter who is standing in line at the scheduled close of early voting (local time) is still eligible to cast a vote.
    1. What do I bring with me to vote? What form of photo ID do I need?
      • You will need to bring a current and valid photo identification with a signature. Approved forms of photo identification are: Florida driver's license; Florida identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles; United States passport; debit or credit card; military identification; student identification; retirement center identification; neighborhood association identification; public assistance identification; veteran health identification card issued by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs; license to carry a concealed weapon or firearm issued pursuant to s. 790.06; or an employee identification card issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the Federal Government, the state, a county, or a municipality (Section 101.043, F.S.).
      • If the photo identification does not have a signature, you must provide additional identification with your signature.
      • A voter information card is not an acceptable form of ID. Your card is a good source of information about your voter registration including your assigned precinct and polling location for Election Day.
    1. Can I still vote if I do not bring identification?
      • Yes, you will be allowed to vote a provisional ballot.
    1. What happens if someone challenges my eligibility to vote at the polls?
      • A voter can be challenged for a number of reasons.
      • If you are challenged at the polls, you still have the right to vote a provisional ballot.
      • If you are challenged because of your address, you may still be able to vote a regular ballot if your new address corresponds to the same precinct. If your new address falls within another precinct, the poll worker will direct you to the proper precinct.
    1. What else do I have to do if I vote a provisional ballot?
      • When you vote provisionally, you will be given a written notice of rights. You have up until 5 PM (local time) on the second day after the election to present further evidence of your eligibility. (See section 101.048, F.S.)
      • If you voted a provisional ballot solely because you did not have an acceptable photo and signature identification, you do not need to provide further evidence of your eligibility in order for your ballot to count, provided you are otherwise eligible.
      • The local canvassing board will compare your signature on the provisional ballot certificate with the signature in your voter registration record. If the signatures match, your provisional ballot will be counted, provided you are otherwise eligible. If your signature is missing from the ballot certificate or does not match, we will attempt to contact you, as soon as practicable with the available contact information in your records, so you can cure the defect. You will need to submit to the Supervisor of Elections a completed DS-DE 210 - Provisional Ballot Cure Affidavit (English PDF /Español PDF) no later than 5 PM (local time) on the second day after the election.
    1. How do I find out if my provisional ballot was counted?
      • Your Notice of Rights will include instructions on how to find out if your provisional ballot was counted, and if not, the reason(s) why. You should be able to get this information no later than 30 days following the election. (Sections 101.048, Fla. Stat.)
    1. How do I request and vote a vote-by-mail ballot (formerly known as absentee ballot)?
      • For information on how to request a ballot, how to vote a ballot, where to return a ballot, and other information, visit our webpage on Vote-by-Mail.
    1. How can I find out about my vote-by-mail ballot request ballot? Where is my ballot?
      • You can track online your vote-by-mail ballot request and ballot. Visit our webpage on Vote-by-Mail for information on How to Track Your Vote-by-Mail Ballot Request and Returned Ballot.
    1. I have changed my mind - can I vote in person even though I requested a ballot?
      • Yes. However, depending on whether you already returned your ballot and if the supervisor of elections’ office has received your ballot, you may vote either a regular ballot or a provisional ballot. 
    1. What happens if I forgot to sign my vote-by-mail ballot?
      • The SOE does it’s due diligence in contacting the voter using the information on file.  The SOE will try contacting the voter by phone, email, and send a cure affidavit by mail.  For this reason we strongly encourage voters submit their email and a contact phone number on the VBM certificate. 
    1. How soon should I return my vote-by-mail ballot?
      • A returned voted ballot must be received, regardless of postmark, by the Supervisor of Elections' office no later than 7:00 pm (local time) on Election Day. A 10-day extension exists for overseas voters only for Presidential Preference Primary and General Elections, provided the ballot is postmarked or dated by Election Day. Untimely received ballots are otherwise not counted.
      • The United States Postal Service recommends that domestic nonmilitary voters mail back their voted ballots at least one (1) week before the Election Day deadline to account for any unforeseen events or weather issues. The Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) provides recommended earlier timelines (see timetable at the bottom of FVAP's website) for absent military and overseas voters. For more information about election mail and the United States Postal Service, visit the webpage on election-mail.
    1. What are the ways I can return my vote-by-mail ballot?
      • A vote-by-mail ballot can be returned by mail or delivered in person. If returned by mail, it can be returned by the United States Postal service or through another private or commercial carrier as long as the ballot is received by the requisite deadline.
      • A vote-by-mail ballot cannot be returned online, by fax, by email or by fax with one exception. Overseas voters (civilian and military) have the option to return their ballot by mail or by fax. Please visit the webpage Military and Overseas Voters for more information.
      • Vote-by-mail ballots may also be deposited into secure drop boxes at the Supervisors of Elections' Ft Lauderdale and Lauderhill office until 7:00 pm (local time) on Election Day. Vote-by-mail ballots may also be deposited at secure drop boxes at designated early voting sites in the county.
    2. Where are drop boxes? Are drop boxes secure?
      • Secure drop boxes are at Supervisors of Elections’ Ft. Lauderdale and Lauderhill offices and at each branch office. Additionally, they to be placed at each early voting site in the county. Optional sites may be added, provided the site could have otherwise qualified as an early voting and the site is staffed in accordance with Section 101.69, Fla. Stat.
    1. How can I be sure that my vote-by-mail ballot will count?
      • Keep your vote registration record current and up to date including your signature which is used to compare against a signature on a ballot certificate. In order to find that signatures do not match between a ballot certificate and a voter registration record, the canvassing board must make such determination by a majority vote and beyond a reasonable doubt.
      • Follow the instructions that come with the ballot and envelope carefully to complete your ballot and sign your envelope.
      • Return your voted ballot no later than the deadline for receipt in the Supervisor of Elections’ office. If returning by mail, build in additional time to return the ballot by mail. Other options for return are to deliver in person or to drop off in officially designated secure drop boxes in your county.
      • Track the return of your ballot in advance of Election Day to ensure that your ballot has been received. You can track online your vote-by-mail ballot request and ballot. Any voter who has requested a vote-by-mail ballot can track online the status of his or her ballot from the date of request through its return to the Supervisor of Elections' office. Visit the Supervisor of Elections Voter Lookup Free Access System.
    1. What should a voter do if intimidated or threatened by text, phone, email, or in person?
      • Provisions exist in law, including not limited to, for felony offenses for deprivation of or interference with voting (Section 104.0515, Fla. Stat.), intimidation and suppression (Section 104.0615, Fla. Stat.), influencing or interfering with voting (Section 104.061, Fla. Stat.), threatening to control votes of employees (Section 104.081, Fla. Stat.). Contact immediately your local law enforcement, Supervisor of Elections' office, and/or the Division of Elections (and file an election fraud complaint).
    1. Can I vote if I am a convicted felon?
      • In order to register to vote and/or vote in Florida, you must not be convicted of a felony or if you have, you must have had your voting rights restored.
        • If convicted of murder or felony sexual offense, voting rights in Florida can only be restored through clemency pursuant to section 8, Art. V of the Florida Constitution. To apply for clemency, search for grant of clemency and certificates, and/or find out more information about clemency, visit the website for the Florida Commission on Offender Review.
        • If convicted of any other felony offense, voting rights are restored upon completion of all terms of a sentence including parole or probation pursuant to section 4., Art. VI of the Florida Constitution. Such convicted felon may alternatively apply for clemency to restore voting rights.
      • For more information, please refer to specific questions on our web page entitled Amendment 4: Standards Governing Eligibility to Vote After a Felony Conviction.
        • You may also contact your Supervisor of Elections' office for any other questions about your registration or voting status.
    1. Can I vote if I am a lawful permanent resident?
      • Only U.S. citizens can register or vote in Florida. Although a lawful permanent resident (commonly referred to as a "green card holder") has the right to live and work in the U.S. on a permanent basis, he or she cannot register or vote.
    1. Can I vote if I have dual citizenship?
      • Yes, as long as you have U.S. citizenship and are otherwise properly registered, you can vote.
    1. If I am a victim of violence, how can I vote and still keep my address and other identifying information confidential?
      • Florida has a program though the Florida Attorney General’s Office that allows victims of actual or threatened domestic violence or stalking, to register for address confidentiality and other identifying information. The Address Confidentiality Program (ACP) will provide a participant with a certificate/authorization form and a substitute address through which you can receive mail. To find out more details or how to apply, please contact the Division of Crime Victims' Services for details at: 850-414-3330.
      • Once registered as an ACP participant, the person can register to vote or if already registered to vote, to obtain continuing address confidentiality as a registered voter. The ACP participant must provide the ACP certificate/authorization form to the county Supervisor of Elections' office. If the ACP participant is a new registered voter, the application will be processed manually in such a way that your voter registration information and record (which is otherwise public record) will not be disclosed or released to the public in any way. If the ACP participant is already a registered voter, the voter registration information and record will be removed from any publicly disclosed or available list. Only your Supervisor of Elections' will know your true address in order to assign you to the proper precinct. Your Supervisor of Elections will send your vote-by-mail ballot to you via the Attorney General's ACP program and they will forward you the ballot using the substitute address that the ACP gave you. You do not and should not go to the polls to vote.
    1. Where can I find a list of candidates for an upcoming or prior election?
      • Visit our webpage on Candidate Information and search for a list of candidates that file with the Broward Supervisor of Elections.  To find what contests (candidates and issues) will appear on your ballot, review your personalized sample ballot.